coromandal


not a leader
August 16, 2014, 6:41 pm
Filed under: brave new world | Tags: , , , ,

To be a leader – in this view below – you must: see yourself, rule yourself, see others, act altruistically, and organize people. There’s a heavy emphasis on charisma, self and action, and a cursory mention of others.

Curiously no mention at all of knowledge or vision: in this view what you know of yourself is more important than what you know of the world. So much so that knowledge of the world isn’t even mentioned. Is this a case of “the worst  / Are full of passionate intensity”?  Charisma is all you need in the age of sheep.

I think a leader pulls us into new places. The rope attached to a dog’s collar is a lead. The whole purpose is wagging your tail on the way to the new place.

Calvino describes the “agile… poet-philosopher who raises himself above the weight of the world, showing that with all his gravity he has the secret of lightness, and that what many consider to be the vitality of the times – noisy, aggressive, revving and roaring – belongs to the realm of death.” A leader pulls us up to a place of lightness and life.

The fatally incomplete list:

What Makes a Leader? Daniel Goleman

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where notable individuals live (and die)

A fantastic mapping of centers of intellectual life in Europe. All Rome until the 18th C when England and Europe explodes into life. It would be fascinating to add schools of thought into this research / visualization. Also, a 20th century map would be instructive to see what ideas are controlling – or freeing – us today.

From CITYLAB, What We Can and Can’t Learn From 2,000 Years of Migration Data for ‘Western Intellectuals’, Researchers recently compiled birth and death data for famous North Americans and Europeans, Mark Byrnes:

Rome was the center of western culture from the Roman Empire to the 1700s, while Paris gained international prominence soon after. Once the industrial revolution took hold, the United Kingdom saw an explosive amount of migration into its cities, as seen in blinding white lights.

The more deaths than births of ‘notable individuals’ a city has, the more likely it serves as a hub for such people. A good example would be Hollywood, a place that, the researchers note, saw more than 10 times as many deaths as births among the names studied. The western world’s ‘notable individuals’ of the 14th century died an average distance of 133 miles from their birth city. But thanks to cars and planes, today’s now die an average of 237 miles from where they were born.

From YouTube:

This video depicts European birth to death network dynamics 0 to 2012 CE according to “deceased persons” in Freebase.com. The video was first published as Movie S1 in the article “A Network Framework of Cultural History” by Schich et al. in Science Magazine on August 1, 2014.

In the current video, the dynamically applied color scheme indicates birth sources (blue) and death attractors (red). Individuals in the videos appear as particles gravitating towards their death locations, indicating collective directions of flow. The video is rendered with one frame per year at 30 frames per second. Further characterization of the movie content is given in the Schich at al. paper.

Data / Video Copyright: Maximilian Schich and Mauro Martino, 2014